Nursing_CS_Intimate-Partner-Violence_03.pdf

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NUR NURSING RE
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Nursing_CS_Intimate-Partner-Violence_03.pdf

School
AMA Computer University*
*We are not endorsed by this school
Course
NUR NURSING RE
Pages
1
Upload Date
Feb 10, 2024
Uploaded by BaronFerretPerson735 on coursehero.com
www.lecturio.com/nursing Leaving the relationship is often the most dangerous time for those experiencing IPV. INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE The cycle of violence Controlling behavior may be subtle at first, then prog ress and become increasingly abusive. Reconciliation and periods of calm may make IPV invisible to others, while making it hard for the survivor to recognize and accept in the early stages. Screening and recognition Intimate partner violence affects people of all cultures, com- munities, genders, and sexual orientations. Screening for IPV should be routine in all health facilities and client populations. Build trusting relationships. A non-judgemental environment may help clients to disclose IPV when they are ready. Recognize signs of possible domestic abuse: Unexplained injuries or bruises Low self-esteem Anxiety, depression Suicidal ideation Alcohol and/or other substance use Unusual or dominating presence of partner during medical visits Reluctance to make decisions without partner Signs of financial control by partner Pregnancy complications such as preterm birth or placental abruption Tips for supporting clients who experience IPV Intimate partner violence (IPV) includes physical and sexual violence, psychological abuse, and/or stalking by a current or former partner. In the United States, as many as one in four women and one in nine men experience IPV. This violence causes diminished mental and physical health, decreases quality of life, and can lead to intergenerational trauma. Be prepared Be familiar with local resources. Have protocols in place for referral when requested. Learn about IPV and how to maintain client safety while offering support. Follow the client's lead Listen without judgment. Ask what client needs. Understand that ending the relationship may not be a safe option for the client. Know the reporting requirements in your state Most states do NOT mandate reporting of domestic violence against an adult victim. Nonconsensual reporting can INCREASE risk for clients experiencing IPV. Always put client safety first. 2. Incident The abuser lashes out through physical, verbal, psychologi - cal, or sexual abuse tactics to dominate the survivor. 3. Reconciliation The abuser makes excuses or attempts to apologize for the incident. Gaslighting is com- mon, aka, "Nothing happened." 4. Calm Things seem peaceful, maybe even better than before. But often, this doesn't last long before the cycle starts over. 1. Tensions build The abuser creates tension and the survivor's stress builds. Help create a safety plan Safety planning may include: Preparing a 'go bag' with personal documents and money in case of need to leave quickly Identifying who they will contact Identifying where they will go Planning how they will signal for help if partner is present or preventing them from leaving 1 2 3 4 WATCH VIDEO!
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